29: Barriers

29: Barriers

What do you think is the largest barrier standing in your way of your design activities – whether publishing, promotion or some other aspect of your process?

 

 

Publishing and the amount of time and effort it takes. There’s so many things to keep track of and making sure everything happens on the right schedule is a lot. Just because a game is published doesn’t mean that there isn’t more work involved with promoting it and preparing for the next convention, in addition to the intense amount of emails that come in every day.

Carla Kopp

Time with playtesters. Nothing speeds a game’s development faster than playtesting, but it takes a lot of time and effort to build and nurture a consistent playtesting community. Not every designer has the skills or desire to do that community work either, and it can come at the cost of design time. But it’s still worth doing.

Isaac Shalev

Generally speaking, the most limited resource is time. There’s never enough time, especially when things like playtesting requires coordinating schedules. More specifically, I often run into a roadblock when it comes time to create a physical prototype, especially when it requires creating a game board, or populating a bunch of card data.

Seth Jaffee

The largest barrier to my design activities is that caused by time constraints. As I only design games as a relatively small proportion of my academic work / in my spare time, I sadly find that it tends to get bumped down the list of ‘important things to do’. However, I am trying to account for this by rewarding myself with more time for game design whenever I cross anything off this list!

Sam Illingworth

There’s so many things to keep track of and making sure everything happens on the right schedule is a lot. Just because a game is published doesn’t mean that there isn’t more work involved with promoting it and preparing for the next convention. — Carla Kopp

Time and money. Designing multiple new games (and managing the development of previously signed games) is time-consuming, and it doesn’t have the certainty of significant financial gain. So the balancing of home-life, non-gaming work-life, and game design is a constant struggle. Ideas come to me frequently; playtesters are easy to find at local game groups; publishers are open and willing. But time and money hold me back.

Adam Porter

Time! I would like to formally request an additional 18 hours in every day, please.

Peter C. Haywards

Between family, friends, and a full-time job (as well as other pursuits and hobbies), time is the one resource I can’t collect more of. I know. I’ve tried! I try to be efficient in all of my processes and still find myself running out of time regularly. In terms of processes, marketing is by far the part that I dislike the most, which explains my tendency to pitch to companies instead of self-publishing. I know that I could do the publishing and promotion parts – and probably do them with some modicum of skill; I just love designing so much more!

Sen-Foong Lim

Ideas come to me frequently; playtesters are easy to find at local game groups; publishers are open and willing. But time and money hold me back. — Adam Porter

Honestly, finding the time to sit and iterate my designs. I have too many ideas that need to be fleshed out and only seem to bump them up the priority list before cons.

Adrienne Ezell

I think you’ll get the same response from a lot of folks, which is Time. Even if designing games is your day job, there’s always a million other things floating around that need to be dealt with every day. We never design in a vacuum, so if you need to run ideas past folks or formalise stuff in a meeting, you need to make sure others are available, which can slow down the pace of development – and that can already be glacial. I try to give even my most out-there ideas a bit of time, just to see if there’s a certain spark that could grow into something more, but does doing that mean I’m potentially limiting the oxygen that another concept needs? There’s not enough hours in the day….

Michael Fox

Laziness. Designing and, even more, playtesting games needs time, work and dedication, all things I’m not very good at. And getting old doesn’t help either.

Bruno Faidutti

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