47: 2019 Highlights Part 1

47: 2019 Highlights Part 1

What is your personal game design highlight for 2019?

 

 

I had two games published overseas this year, and it was a very surreal feeling to see something I made get printed in German/Chinese. It felt great to know that something I had created was (hopefully!) giving people enjoyment on the other side of the world.

Alex Cutler

Tabletop Network in conjunction with BGG – such great presentations and information. I walked away with 3 games in the works from all the inspiration.

Adrienne Ezell

My personal design highlight of 2019 is Kingdom Rush: Rift in Time. It was a huge success on Kickstarter. The swell of support and anticipation for the game, as well as the early feedback on the system from testers at conventions in the beginning of the year was incredible. It has been a huge project to work on since then and along the way I’ve learned so much about design, systems, and collaboration. We’re wrapping it up just as we move into the new year and it’s been an intense sprint, and I can’t wait to see what backers think of what we made, and to have the final product in my hands.

Jessey Wright

I really enjoyed finishing Carbon City Zero, and was particularly proud that we were able to positively respond to (and incorporate) many of the suggestions we got from the communities we co-created the game with.

Sam Illingworth

It felt great to know that something I had created was (hopefully!) giving people enjoyment on the other side of the world. — Alex Cutler

2019 has been an amazing year for game design, both personally and for the industry in general. I think my highlight is seeing so many more women making games, and seeing us get to know and support each other in amazing ways, both online and in person. It’s not as lonely here anymore, and I am very thankful for that.

Roberta Taylor

Reimplementing Cutthroat Caverns as a solo play APP experience. The card game offers players a chance to interrupt and spoil almost every action you can take, so waiting on other players to act or network lag would have made the game unplayable. Yet, the whole fun of Cutthroat Caverns is the player interaction. Through a combination of pacing, animated reactions and voice overs from the avatars, we were able to deliver an experience that still has you cursing characters on the screen. But it was the design of the 6 individual AI personalities which subtly recreates the card game experience. I crafted each of the 6 characters to behave in unique ways, mirroring the behaviour from various personality types observed at our gaming tables over the past 12 years.

Curt Covert

My highlight for 2019 was the release of my book, Building Blocks of Game Design: An Encyclopedia of Mechanisms. Working with Geoff Engelstein was an honour and an education, and having BoardGameGeek adopt our rubric as their own was something I never imagined would happen. I’m thankful to everyone who supported me, and proud to have contributed something meaningful to our community.

Isaac Shalev

Finally – after 5+ years of designing – making a “big game” (60+ minutes) that I’m proud of.

Peter C. Hayward

I think my highlight is seeing so many more women making games, and seeing us get to know and support each other in amazing ways, both online and in person. — Roberta Taylor

I had the idea to design a street basketball game. I knew sports simulation was a super challenging, but went for it anyway. I’m extremely happy that now I have a prototype version of the game that not only works, it’s also fun to play and feels like street basketball!

Omari Akil

Kingdom Rush was a highlight for 2019. Helana Hope, Jessey Wright, and I have been working diligently on the project with Lucky Duck for the past year after raising over a million dollars on Kickstarter – as huge fans of the original app, we are really proud of the final design! On a more personal note, we are in the process of finalising the roleplaying game that Banana Chan and I are writing called Jiangshi: Blood in the Banquet Hall. That game means a lot to both of us as it’s about Chinese immigration to North America. And restaurants. And vampires.

Sen-Foong Lim

Getting to play MegaCity: Oceania with folks at so many conventions throughout the year. Of all the times, my favourite game was at Essen, when four hearing impaired guys came to play accompanied by their sign language interpreter. She helped with explaining the rules and the game was up and running in a few minutes. All she needed to do afterwards was translate the table talk that was going on, and it was… well, let’s just say I couldn’t stop laughing. They kept digging at each other HARD, and all the while this polite interpreter is telling them to behave, that they shouldn’t use such language in public, that kind of thing. Meanwhile, the players are telling her that hardly anyone could understand sign language at Essen anyway, so they turn up the dirt to 11, all the while playing the game and having a ball, trash-talking each others’ creations. At the end of the game, I’d realised that the table had pretty much been in silence for nearly an hour, surrounded by the chaos of Essen all around us – a calm oasis of filth surrounded by a sea of noise. A weird and wonderful memory.

Michael Fox

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