50: Questions Part 2

50: Questions Part 2

What question would you love to ask the rest of the contributors of the Design 100? What would you hope to learn?

 

 

My real answer is ‘What should Bez do differently?’

Having someone give you personalised advice is amazing. Of course, giving truly personalised advice is a serious burden (it requires that you know the person seeking the advice for a start) and in the end, it turns out we’re all floundering around in the dark.

I’d particularly like to learn ‘How have you forged professional relationships?’ and, ‘What’s the most efficient way to pitch?’

And (again straying into the probably-overly-specific), ‘Is there an idiot-proof printer I can buy that will work easily?’

Bez Shahriari

I would love to ask the other designers what their process for playtesting was. By asking this question I would hope to learn new and effective ways to playtest future designs.

Sam Illingworth

I’d love to ask the rest of the contributors this question: how can we continue to bring new people into gaming in general and design specifically? I would love to learn about ways in which we can engage people through board games who otherwise may not try them and especially how we can turn people on to game design. I want to play interesting and diverse games until the day I die – we’ll need more interesting and diverse people to make those games! Bonus question – What would it / did it take to allow you to be a full-time game designer?

Sen-Foong Lim

What is the most under appreciated game you love and feel never got its just due? And why do you think this may have been the case? It is likely a long list and perhaps we can all learn something about how to avoid such a fate for our games.

Curt Covert

I always like to know what folks are actually playing, so I’d ask “What game – that you’ve had no involvement in creating – have you played most in the past two years?”. As a follow up, “In your eyes, what does that game do incredibly well?”. A lot of this is down to sheer inquisitiveness, but I’d also hope to learn a lot about what kinds of games make the various other contributors happy or content – after all, you don’t play something multiple times if you don’t actually like it, surely?

Michael Fox

I’d love to learn about a tool, a technique or a process that my fellow designers have embraced that made a big impact on their productivity. For me, organising each game as a column on a large Trello board helps me a lot. It’s less about organising and capturing everything, and more about knowing exactly what the next action I can take on any given project is. That makes getting started much easier.

Isaac Shalev

Having someone give you personalised advice is amazing. Of course, giving truly personalised advice is a serious burden (it requires that you know the person seeking the advice for a start) and in the end, it turns out we’re all floundering around in the dark. — Bez Shahriari

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